How to Find Animals to Photograph

Many parts of wildlife photography can be very difficult. One of the hardest things for me is being able to find the actual creature that you are trying to photograph. Obviously some animals are easier to find than others but some of the tips below will be a helpful reminder on How to Find Animals to Photograph. The first and foremost is to look for animal homes. Dens, burrows, nests, and other living quarters. Most likely finding their home and watching it will provide you with an opportunity to make some images. Animals are most active in the morning and evening, unless they are nocturnal. Try to reach your destination before the animals departs or before the animal returns.

Second is to look for food sources. This could be nuts, fruit trees, farming fields, even a bait pile you have placed to attract them in. Water sources are also a great place to look for critters. Again the key is to arrive before they do. Trying to sneak up on an animal is always harder than having them sneak up on you. Be still, be quit, and they will come.

Look for the opposite sex. During mating season most often the males are on a quest to mate. Some mating windows are only four or five days, so the males are on a mission to mate as much as they can. Most times they will forego eating and sometimes sleeping to try to find a mate. If you happen upon a group of female during the rut or mating season, it's very likely that if you wait, eventually a male will arrive. This goes for many species of animals.

Also if you do observe behavior, it's likely the animal will repeat that behavior in the following days, weeks, months, or even years. Birds often migrate around the same time each year, and about the same route. Animal mating seasons occur around the same time each year. Trails to food and water sources are often the same for the season. Food gathering rituals are often the same as well.

If you can find where an animal lives, eats, and mates then you are well on your way to finding critters to photograph.

The Pika will leave its nest, that is usually found under boulders and rocks, to gather grasses/hay. The Pika will return with a mouthful forming haystacks in the nest. The grasses will dry out and he will live all w</a/> The Pika will leave its nest, that is usually found under boulders and rocks, to gather grasses/hay. The Pika will return with a mouthful forming haystacks in the nest. The grasses will dry out and he will live all winter on his stored food. I saw this little guy running back and forth from his nest. When he left I positioned myself to capture an image when he was to return. He didn't even notice me until he was on his way back out to gather more. From there he just perched himself on a nearby rock making the little squeak noise a pika makes until I moved on. Once I did he continued his gathering. This pika was located in the Canadian rockies but can also be found in much of the western united states in the mountainous regions.</p>
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